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Aeial View of the River

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best time to run the Bonaventure is in early- to mid-June. The mountain snowmelt is at its peak, the runoff is high enough to practically guarantee exciting rapids, and the bugs have yet to begin their annual onslaught. Its remoteness ensures that you will probably have the river to yourself, at least until you near its mouth at the sea.

A spectacular river on Quebecs Gaspe Pennisula. This is not a beginners trip, but something to work up to. For those who like to use a canoe setting pole, this is the best. You can literally pole the whole trip if you can stand it. This is a 7 day trip, including travel to and from the river, starts and finishes in Presque Isle, Maine.

Bonaventure River

The Bonaventure River surges out of the Chic Choc Mountains of eastern Québec. As with most mountain rivers, the water is clear and cold, and moves at a fast clip. The Bonaventure River flows through the Gaspé Peninsula, a giant thumb of land sticking out into the cold waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

The Gaspé is a long haul from anywhere and, although there are small fishing villages scattered here and there on the peninsula's edge, the interior is virtually uninhabited. For canoeists, this means an undisturbed expanse of virgin wilderness surrounding an unspoiled gem of whitewater. The river is a dream, an almost endless smorgasbord of Class II and III rapids, with a few Class IVs thrown in for good measure. The Bonaventure originates deep in the Gaspé's interior and flows south 85 miles to Chaleur Bay in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Deep canyons, looming mountain peaks, and incredible scenery add to the feast. Moose, black bear, and lynx inhabit the Gaspé.

 

Cascapedia River

The Cascapedia River – An exploratory trip for us in 2004.   Starting high in the Chic-Chocs Mountains of Quebec's Gaspe Peninsula, the Cascapedia is a clear, cold water river flowing from the mountains to the sea.  The water is continuous, fast Class I-II. The river scenery is beautiful, winding through a deep valley with crystal clear water. Moose, deer, black bear and lynx inhabit the Gaspe. In the lower river there are deep salmon pools and fishermen. (We don't fish as the pools require Canadian fishing guides with pool-specific permits.)

 The best time to run the Cascapedia is in June. The mountain snowmelt is at its peak, the runoff is high enough to provide water enough for poling or padling, and the bugs have yet to begin dominate the north. Its remoteness and lack of publicity ensures that we will have the river to ourselves, at least until we near its mouth at the sea. The Gaspé  has very few inhabatants although there are small fishing villages scattered here and there on the peninsula's edge, the interior is virtually uninhabited. For canoeists, this means an undisturbed expanse of wilderness surrounding an unspoiled gem of whitewater.

All Outdoors offers a seven-day, six-night wilderness canoe/camping expedition.  For those who like to use a canoe setting pole, this among the is the best. You can literally pole the whole trip. There are no portages, but there may be a short drag around dry-ki.

 We will arrange to meet guests the day prior to the start date in Bangor or Presque Isle, Maine, to which air service is available. We will travel to the Gaspe that night and stay in a motel for the first night . After breakfast the next day we will be shuttled to the put-in, where we will paddle a short distance to camp. For the next six days we will paddle and pole our way down this beautiful Canadian wilderness river. After take-out on Day 7 we will drive to local accommodations for dinner and lodging. The next day we will travel back to Presque Isle or Bangor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEPISIGUIT RIVER

 The name Nepisiguit River derives from the Mi'kmaq name meaning "river the dashes roughly along." The Mi'kmaq (also commonly spelled Micmac) are an indigenous people with traditional lands primarily in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. 

The Nepisiguit River has been billed as the best whitewater trip in New Brunswick. Beginning in the province's northeastern Mount Carleton Provincial Park, it flows east then north into the Baie des Chaleurs at the city of Bathurst. In the park, Mount Carleton is the highest peak in the Maritimes at about 2,700 feet, named after New Brunswick's first Lieutenant Governor, Thomas Carleton, 1736-1817. 

On Day 1 we will drive approximately four hours from Bangor, Maine to the park and Lake Bathurst. We will spend the next days canoeing, sightseeing and fishing the 70 miles down river. There are brook trout to catch and on our way into the park we will purchase fishing licenses. On Day 7 it will be approximately six hours driving back to Bangor. 

The trip cost includes all transportation to and from the meeting point in Maine, camping fees, canoes, group camping gear, guide services and food on the river. Guests are responsible for travel to and from our meeting point in Maine, food to and from the river, and fishing licenses. To reserve your place, a deposit of 30% is required with the balance due four weeks prior to the start date. Please contact us for further information or reservations.
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